1974 CT70 K3 Restoration Project

Discussion in 'Projects/Builds' started by ArcticMinibike, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    Your sparkplug coil(HTcoil) will have a black wire coming from it that plugs into the main harness up by the battery(male bullet connector). The wires from the stator assembly that plug into the main harness, one of them is black. Separate the stator plug from the main harness, then run the jumper wire to connect these two wires. This will totally bypass the wiring system. After completing this, check for spark at the plug. If the engine starts, you can kill the engine with the choke(unless its cold outside.lol).

    BTW, make sure the HTcoil mounts are grounding to the frame. Also, the engine mounts need to ground to the frame.

    BTW #2. Go ahead and check to see if the ignition switch itself is grounding to the frame. I just stick one lead onto the center of the switch and the other onto an engine mount bolt or rear shock mount.
     
    #201 cjpayne, Jun 13, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
  2. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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    Bypassing the black wire to the coil didn't make a difference. Since the harness is new, I didn't have high hopes. Pretty sure the ignition switch (assuming you mean the key switch) is grounded, but will double check. Again, I get green neutral light on speedo.

    What's next? I can either gut the stator and re-populate with a rebuild kit or pull out the HT coil and check my spark plug wire splice. I'll have to pull the tank but at least it's freshly installed and no fuel. Should come out easy. I have a spare coil too, I think, but don't know if it's good. Got it in a box of used parts from someone. Looks ancient.

    I'm avoiding using the stator kit If not needed, I'd want to sell it as I only bought it for a worst case scenario.

    Which should be next? Pull the tank and swap the coil & plug wire?
     
  3. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Most likely source of your woes is in the stator assembly, probably points or condenser. Don't see many failed primary coils, even fewer secondary (HT). Before swapping coils, break out the ohmmeter and verify that one is either open or shorted...the odds against either condition are high.

    Maybe try cleaning & gapping the points, from the get-go.
     
  4. kirrbby

    kirrbby Well-Known Member

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    Your points and condenser are new, yes?
    Dbl...triple check the points gap...somewhere around .016 INCHES.

    Good spark plug?

    Key on, kill switch set to run? You could unplug the kill switch to rule it out.

    If you had the jumper hooked up right, that rules out everything but the stator plate parts, the HT coil...including it's ground, and the spark plug.

    Start with the points...keep the jumper hooked up until you get spark...it's the shortest route.

    If you pull the flywheel, show us a few good close pics of the stator.
     
  5. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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    If I had to guess, it's either my spark plug wire splice from old to new cable, or something on the stator.

    Points and Condenser are new. Points are set correct or darn close. This is one of two bikes I learned to set points on back in the late 70's, so I'm pretty sure it's right.

    All I can think of is a short in one of the stator wires or I overheated the condenser when soldering. When I was a kid I always used a gun for soldering, quick and hot. I no longer have that gun so used my light wattage soldering iron I use for circuit boards. Took a LONG time to get everything heated up enough for a good joint. I'm pretty sure it's not a cold joint, but everything on the condenser got pretty hot for an extended period of time in the process.

    What threw me was that when I checked continuity on the stator, there was continuity just about all over it, so to speak. I didn't expect that and so I posted an earlier entry on it. For example, continuity between the case of the condenser and the center of it. Seems wrong in every way. When I tried the light bulb points open/closed test, the brightness change was very faint between open and closed at the F position, more of a blink than a dimming. I've never used that method before so I could have been doing it wrong. Normally I just screw the points and condenser on, solder, attach points wire, set the points gap and be done with it.

    I need to re-run my bypass test. I did it in a hurry, and it's 99 degrees here in Omaha today (typical College World Series weather) and so I was less than focused. Forgot that my kill switch was set to OFF this time. Doh!! Even so, I don't expect it to change the outcome but maybe I'll get lucky.

    I'll re-run the test with the switch ON. When that doesn't work, I'll double check the connections, especially the spark plug wire splice to the coil plug wire. I'll dig into the headlight and verify the connections to the kill switch. I rebuilt that switch so I'll check the continuity of the on/off positions.
     
  6. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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  7. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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    Decal Adhesive Removal...

    So many threads here about decal removal, but all are so old I hate to dig them up (some sites get all pissed if you reply to an old thread).

    I removed my old decal by peeling it off. The edges were curling and it came off mostly in one chunk. The one I took off was a metallic backing, and as far as I know, original. I didn't use any heat.

    As for the adhesive that was left, I used this old bottle of Elmer's "Sticky Out". Citrus based stuff that's been in my cupboard for many years. Not sure if still being made. It didn't seem to bother the paint at all. I just was patient, letting it soften as I rubbed with a paper towel. As it softened, I was able to rub it with my finger into balls or chunks that I could peel off. Eventually it all came off and I used a swipe of rubbing alcohol to degrease and remove whatever traces of remover were left. It was actually way easier than I thought it would be.

    I'm glad I didn't use heat, since I think it would have made a much bigger mess, reactivating that old adhesive and making it sticky. Leaving it cold worked for me.

    sticky.jpg
     
  8. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    We don't mind if old threads resurface from time-to-time. That's why they're left intact...to be used as a resource.

    Decal removal is as much art as it is science. Decals are not all the same, nor have they aged under the same conditions and for the same duration. Whatever works, works, just don't make the mistake of thinking that there's a one-size-fits-all method...there isn't. Looks like this worked well for you so, in this instance, it was the best methodology. I wouldn't be surprised if that Elmer's product is the same as Mostenbocher's Lift Off; at one time, the latter product had the Elmers logo...good stuff, IMO.

    As for heat vs no heat, I've had very good results with a heat gun, used with a lot of care. Usually, 95% of the adhesive will come off with the decals, the rest can be rolled off or/and chemically dissolved. Isopropyl alcohol, automotive paste wax, mineral spirits, all work and are gentle enough to not affect the fragile original paint.
     

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