1977 CT70 Basket Case

nightgrider

Member
I was digging through my tool box at work an found this 80 grit emery cloth buffer…if you can find one in the right size it might do the job?
I'll have to take good measurements of the triple tree clamps and stock forks to see the difference so I can replicate it for the aftermarket forks. I'll have to see what I can find to help relieve the clamps. These are all good suggestions from everyone. Thanks
 

nightgrider

Member
I picked up a hone the other day. I just need the weather to get more consistently warm. So I can move the project put to my detached garage and be able to leave it set up to work on. Also got a lot of parts I need to sandblast and paint.
 

cjpayne

Well-Known Member
I remember having to replace my forks a few years ago. I got a flat blade and was able to get them out, but getting them back in proved to be alot more difficult. Cant remember who(I think it was kirrbby), but they suggested slipping the flat blade back in the crack and then using a bolt, from the other end of the fork clamp, to spread it out. Worked for me.
 

nightgrider

Member
I remember having to replace my forks a few years ago. I got a flat blade and was able to get them out, but getting them back in proved to be alot more difficult. Cant remember who(I think it was kirrbby), but they suggested slipping the flat blade back in the crack and then using a bolt, from the other end of the fork clamp, to spread it out. Worked for me.
I used a flathead screwdriver to help spread the clamp to get the originals out. For the aftermarket forks it didn't help so much. I haven't tried putting something in the crack using the bolt to spread them. I will see of it helps once things warm back up.
 

nightgrider

Member
Been busy on other projects for a while. I need to get back on the CT70. I've been looking at hand reamers lately. What's everyone's thoughts on reaming the triple tree to fit the aftermarket forks?

 

nightgrider

Member
Picked up a new seat cover for the '77. Hopefully I can get some time to get it over to the upholstery shop and have the seat recovered.
 

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kirrbby

Well-Known Member
Been busy on other projects for a while. I need to get back on the CT70. I've been looking at hand reamers lately. What's everyone's thoughts on reaming the triple tree to fit the aftermarket forks?

Still surprised that it won't go in there. But I guess you do what you gotta do...make it work.
Take care to cut straight and steady so as not to warble out the holes, or cut them crooked. Hopefully you don't need much.
 

nightgrider

Member
Still surprised that it won't go in there. But I guess you do what you gotta do...make it work.
Take care to cut straight and steady so as not to warble out the holes, or cut them crooked. Hopefully you don't need much.
Thanks for the advice. Things are warmer now, I haven't tried to install the forks again since it was cold out. I really need to get back on the CT70. Once I get the forks on things should smooth out... fingers crossed.
 

nightgrider

Member
Does anyone know what material the headlight buckets are molded out of? I've got a few cracks I'd like to repair to make mine serviceable. I was figuring a standard epoxy would serve well, but wanted to check to be sure. Thanks
 

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Robert thran

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know what material the headlight buckets are molded out of? I've got a few cracks I'd like to repair to make mine serviceable. I was figuring a standard epoxy would serve well, but wanted to check to be sure. Thanks
There made from plastic,, there’s a product called “rapid fix” that I’ve used with great success.. its a super glue with a bonding powder ..you can build it up from both sides ( or just the inside) then sand it down .. it’s sold on ebay but you can find it at some auto parts stores.. just lightly sand surfaces and clean ,,, make sure it flows down in the crack..i bought my 1st rapid fix off the snap on tool truck but not sure if it’s a snap on based product or just something my dealer had on his truck and was selling…I have bought it from pep boys but around here they no longer sell parts ,,,they only do service work..it works really good on any plastic..
 

kirrbby

Well-Known Member
I friend showed me a similar product years back. Then he showed me that you can have the same effect by simply sprinkling baking soda into regular super glue..?
 

nightgrider

Member
There made from plastic,, there’s a product called “rapid fix” that I’ve used with great success.. its a super glue with a bonding powder ..you can build it up from both sides ( or just the inside) then sand it down .. it’s sold on ebay but you can find it at some auto parts stores.. just lightly sand surfaces and clean ,,, make sure it flows down in the crack..i bought my 1st rapid fix off the snap on tool truck but not sure if it’s a snap on based product or just something my dealer had on his truck and was selling…I have bought it from pep boys but around here they no longer sell parts ,,,they only do service work..it works really good on any plastic..
Thanks, I've used a similar product in the past called plastifix, but it only works on certain plastics. I'll take a look at the "rapid fix". Thanks
 

Robert thran

Well-Known Member
ive used it on Honda sl70 and sl100 side covers ( made from the same type plastic) as well as ct70 headlight buckets and works really good on that type of plastic..
 

Robert thran

Well-Known Member
P.s. if you go that route just make sure you have everything squeezed together and in place because you only get one shot at it..once it dries that’s pretty much where’s it’s going to stay..also have the powder opened an ready to sprinkle on before the glue drys..maybe practice on something else or the smallest crack first. The glue part in runny almost like water so it’s easy to make a big mess if not careful..start small and you can build it up in stages if needed. Like I said in earlier post you can sand it down so it’s not a big deal if it does become a mess but just adds to the work..sometime less is more..lol
 

nightgrider

Member
P.s. if you go that route just make sure you have everything squeezed together and in place because you only get one shot at it..once it dries that’s pretty much where’s it’s going to stay..also have the powder opened an ready to sprinkle on before the glue drys..maybe practice on something else or the smallest crack first. The glue part in runny almost like water so it’s easy to make a big mess if not careful..start small and you can build it up in stages if needed. Like I said in earlier post you can sand it down so it’s not a big deal if it does become a mess but just adds to the work..sometime less is more..lol
Thanks for the tips. I think I will pick some of the rapid fix up.
 

nightgrider

Member
I finally got some time to hone the triple tree. It worked really well. Only required a very light honing. Now the aftermarket forks slide in by hand with just a tiny bit of resistance. Like the factory forks. I used a 25mm ball flex-hone, in case anyone is considering the aftermarket forks. Thanks to everyone for the help and suggestions.
 

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