71K0 just brought out of a LOOONNGG storage.

Discussion in 'Projects/Builds' started by cjpayne, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    If you're going to replace the rings, de-glaze the cylinder. Shouldn't take much. Being past the 100-mile mark, it's too late for a "second seating" (pun sort of intended). CT70 cam & rockers are dime-a-dozen parts. Good head castings, with a specifically desired set of casting numbers...not so much.
    I was thinking that, too. Which one of us should be "very afraid"?:ROFLMAO:
     
  2. OLD CT

    OLD CT Well-Known Member

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    Keeping the guilty party AWAY from the bike in the future will be key to CJ's hairline. Do they make a locking oil cap?o_O Seriously, I would pull the clutch cover first, to look.
     
  3. Gary

    Gary Active Member

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    Actually water does not seem to bother any engine. Happens often with raw water cooled marine engines. Exhausts go bad,gaskets fail,motor takes on water. You just do as exactly as you did. It becomes a problem if an engine with a closed cooling system ie your car and gets antifreeze in it's oil. Antifreeze acts like valve grind paste and destroys bearings,it will happen before you even suspect because how often do you check your oil? My wifes car does not even have a dipstick- you never even look at the oil.....
     
  4. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    I have often thought it was a piece of shop towel or something similar. There have been kids around this thing, but why would they bother removing the dipstick and shoving paper in there????
    I have also thought that I may have left a piece in there, but I would think for sure that it would have reared its ugly head WAY before now, surely within a few miles it would have clogged the screen. I do remember using a few towels, rags, and cleaners, but immediately threw them away as I was using them to clean. I also remember taking the cases back apart a few times before I realized the kickshaft wasn't clocked right and I surely would have noticed then(hopefully). Every once in awhile, when I was over there, I would check the oil, but always used my pant leg or shirt to wipe the dipstick(lol, I know, I'm a redneck). It has plagued my brain alot lately how this happened, but for now, I'm stumped. Anyway, just need to get some time and get it fixed right.
     
  5. power6994

    power6994 Member

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    Oil pump gasket? Maybe ?
     
  6. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't look like gasket material to me and from the amount I've seen so far, the two pump gaskets just arent enough.
     
  7. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    After my Thanksgiving dinner wore off, I decided it was time to do some investigating.

    Got the head dismantled and cleaned up. Found very little contamination in the rocker area. The cam and rockers just show normal wear. The cam journals FORTUNATELY look pretty good to me. My phone camera is still pretty crappy, but here's some pics of the T-chain side. There are no grooves or scoring, just a few lite scratches from cam installation and removal( I guess) or tooling. Didn't find any contamination in the passage from the oil pump. The T-chain area in the head and jug were kinda bad.

    IMGA2348.jpg IMGA2349.jpg
    The bad part came when I took the clutch cover off.lol
    That crap is everywhere!!!!
    Looks like the oil screen got most of it though, but WOW is it clogged. That stuff is definitely ground up shop towel. Compaired to the stator and T-chain area's, the clutch area is definitely where the contamination originated.

    IMGA2350.jpg

    The spinner filter had very little in it. Just the usual clutch and carbon clay. I took the clutch completely apart and cleaned it up. Had the contamination on the inside of the outer part of the round housing. Discs, springs, main springs, and the little rollers were clean.

    IMGA2353.jpg

    Here is the inside of the clutch cover. If you look close, you can see the little slivers everywhere. I also got the jug and the clutch cover cleaned up and bagged up. I used up nearly all of my electrical contact cleaner on the cover alone, just to save the paint. The oil passage in it was still clean as was the inside of the adjuster.

    IMGA2351.jpg IMGA2352.jpg

    I am now out of brake clean and carb cleaner. Took me two cans of that stuff to get this far. I should have bought more.lol
    I haven't even gotten to splitting the cases yet. Gonna stop for now. This engine is a MESS. Those little slivers are everywhere. This is going to take awhile. Wish I had a vat tank handy right now. Also forgot to order the snap rings.
     
  8. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Brakleen is potent stuff. For this kind of bulk cleaning, however, you'd be better off with a 2.5 gallon bench top parts washer and mineral spirits. The petroleum-based solvent is far less aggressive & volatile. It won't affect paint, or leave items like transmission parts susceptible to flash rust. I'd recommend a trip to HF for the parts washer and relegating Brakleen to final cleaning, immediately prior to oiling, as you reassemble the motor.

    Can't really see any serious injuries, in this series of pix. There may be a lot of cleaning in your future but, it'd be a bit surprising if the replacement parts total exceeds what's lurking beneath your sofa cushions.
     
  9. Gary

    Gary Active Member

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    How about a Rubbermaid container and some mineral spirits and a brush. Then do the final clean with brake cleaner. I actually bought a bench top parts washer but if you want to get away on the cheap. Oh and some good nitrile gloves so your not diving in the stuff.
     
  10. ctbale

    ctbale Member

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    5 gallon bucket
    stoddard solvent
    compressor blow gun
     
    cjpayne likes this.
  11. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    Oh yeah, I could sure use a parts washer.lol
    After cleaning, I've been saturating with WD40 and then bagging every thing up. I will probably wait for the snap rings to come in before splitting the cases.
     
  12. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Mineral spirits leave a light, oily, residue eliminating the need for WD40. I give everything a shot of Brakleen, followed by motor oil, at assembly time. That's not strictly necessary, since mineral spirits are petroleum-based. The parts can be dried using compressed air, then oiled and installed. If they're going to sit for some time, they can just be oiled & installed. That's standard procedure in shops that rebuild engines, transmissions and differentials. The minute quantity of residue will dissipate with oil. With an engine, it's all gone with the first oil change.

    The big advantage of a parts washer is the stream of clean solvent, plus that dry platform.

    If you're meticulously bagging every part, may as well just oil everything and save yourself a step, imho...
     
  13. kirrbby

    kirrbby Well-Known Member

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    If I get into a lot of heavy cleaning at home, I hav a gallon of kerosene that I've been re-using for years. Dirt settles into the bottom of the jug between uses. The kerosene works well cutting thru grime. But since I've had access to a parts washer at work, I'm completely spoiled to that thing. Heated water base solution works well and leaves a film that prevents rust. Like Bob said, the stream of cleaner IS what it's all about. They have a parts cleaning brush that the cleaner pumps thru...cats ass for gooey grime.
     
  14. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    I dont have access to a parts washer, but I was thinking of maybe using some diesel in some sort of tub.
    Someday when I have my own garage again, it would be SOOO nice to have a parts washer and a blast cabinet.
     
  15. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    There's an idea I should have thought of.
    I have an oil can with used oil in for chains, doors, ect. All I would need is a new one to keep new oil in. Need to get/do that for sure.
     
  16. ctbale

    ctbale Member

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    18 gal Rubbermaid tote
    3 gallons of gas
    parts brush splashing and cleaning ... with a cigarette hanging out of my mouth. what? what? ;)
     
  17. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    Went to get the star bracket out and the screw stripped on me. The star moved on me too. I then remembered that I put blue locktite in there. This sucks. I then got my dremel to cut a slot into it and the battery was near dead. Don't really want to drill it out and shavings go everywhere too.

    IMGA2357.jpg

    While waiting for the dremel batt to charge, I managed to pick this out with a screwdriver and hemostats. Most of that is from the oil screen. Looks to be the bulk of it, but the slivers are everywhere.

    IMGA2358.jpg
     
  18. cjpayne

    cjpayne Well-Known Member

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    Well, I got everything cleaned up and have started to reassemble. Problem is I have a mystery washer from somewhere. It does not show up on any of the parts fiche's. It is aluminum and its as thick as a quarter. Dont know how in the world it would have gotten at the bottom of the tranny area. I thought maybe it went between the left case and the kicker shaft as some sort of bushing. I tried it and the cases wouldn't fit together. I also do not EVER remember seeing a washer anywhere on these bikes this size or made from aluminum. The first time I ever had this engine apart, I had left it laying on its left side when I had replaced the gear and do not remember seeing this. Discovered it after the tranny removal and when using the cleaner down at the bottom of the tranny area.

    imga2366.jpg
    imga2367.jpg

    Here it is on the end of the kickshaft side that goes into the left case. I am pushing on the bottom of it to show the gap in the spacing.

    IMGA2368.jpg
     
    #238 cjpayne, Dec 25, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2018
  19. Deoodles

    Deoodles Well-Known Member

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    Is it the oil bolt crush washer?
     
  20. Deoodles

    Deoodles Well-Known Member

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    Or the washer at the bottom of the timing chain
     

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