Just got a k2 ct70!

Discussion in 'Projects/Builds' started by KenL, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. KenL

    KenL New Member

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    Just picked up a 1973 Honda trail 70 with a 4 speed manual. Guy I bought it from got it in 2014 with plans of restoring it, but he never got around to it. He said he started it about a week ago and it ran through all four gears. I tested it and it has good compression, currently cant get it to start but I'm pretty sure its the spark plug. I can feel the current when I crank the engine over, but the spark plug doesnt want to spark. So I'll be picking up a new one tomorrow. The bike currently doesnt have a speedo, or front brake cable, but other than that its mostly complete. He gave me a brand new exhaust with it as well. I will be sure to update y'all when I get the new spark plug. In the meantime, ill probably gut the carb and clean it after I get out of work.
     

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  3. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Pretty nice starting point, i.e. base bike. The missing/incorrect (for the model/year) stuff (seat, muffler, tail light assembly) is mostly easy enough to replace...if you're going for a resto. K2 speedos aren't the most common but, you could use a K1-`78 and be reasonably close to 'correct". The motor is the weird piece in all of this. It's not original to the bike but, a 4-speed/manual clutch is something most riders prefer. What strikes me, however, is how straight and basically clean this bike is. That paint is remarkably vibrant, especially considering that the green pigment used back in the day was remarkably fade-prone.

    If you're just after a really nice rider, or light restomod, this looks to be great raw material.

    As for the weak ignition, the system is similar to a lawnmower engine magneto. It's simple & reliable, not much to fail. You might try cleaning & gapping the points. If that doesn't do the job, throw a set of points + condenser at it. Oh, and make sure that the battery plug is in place, plugged into the wire harness; there's a primary circuit jumper lead in it. Alternatively, you could rig up a temporary jumper...to connect the primary igntion output (from the stator) directly to the HT coil input, bypassing the wire harness. just be aware that, if you do get normal spark, you'll have no kill switch in this (test) configuration.
     
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  4. KenL

    KenL New Member

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    For now I just want to get it running and have it be a nice little commuter bike thats off road capable. Also, the k2s werent offered in a manual configuration or is it just rare? Thanks for the info btw, I appreciate it.
     
  5. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    The HK1 was the end of the 4-speeds, in North America. K2-later all left the factory as 3-speed, semi-automatics.

    You should be able to get the bike running well, as long as the engine has full compression. That's a K0 exhaust and it flows more than enough to support any 72cc motor that came fitted to one of these bikes. I'd suggest checking the tires for dry rot, and the brake action; those are safety items.

    It's also a good idea to drain, flush and refill the fork legs. There's a lot of abrasive crap inside them. If you want to do a first rate job, take them apart for the cleaning and replace the seals (which don't cost much), then refill with 15W fork oil, adjusting the fill quantity ("oil tuning") to get the best suspension feel. That's the biggest bang-for-the-buck suspension improvement possible on a K1-`79 model; you'll reap the benefits immediately and for years to come.

    The one thing you're probably going to want to replace soon is the seat. You're in luck with that. Brand-new repop K2 seats can be had and they're inexpensive, bolt-on-and-ride ready.

    Try to remember that while these bikes have proved remarkably viable & durable, your K2 is still a 47 year old motorcycle. A little extra mechanical attention is long overdue...and I do mean "a little". That's enough to get you the reliable little rider you envision.
     
  6. vintagehondatrailbikes

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    Post the frame and engine numbers. Some convert their original engine to 4 speed manual. You could also ask the previous owner. They may still have the original engine if this is a replacement.
     

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