Re-chrome parts

Discussion in 'Projects/Builds' started by nemesis88, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. nemesis88

    nemesis88 Member

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    Hey guys. So I'm getting ready to start my 77 ct70 restore .I have the handlebars and fenders but they need to be rechromed. Does anyone have and idea of the going rate to do it? I'm thinking it's cheaper than buying replacement parts as I am trying to use only oem Honda parts not China knockoff stuff. Thanks so much for your help! Anthony
     
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  3. allenp42

    allenp42 Active Member

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    This is about as recent as I can give you:)

    https://lilhonda.com/index.php?threads/great-chrome-shop-price.18266/

    As an FYI, I doubt that you can re-chrome your fenders for the price of new. But on the other hand, triple chrome sure looks a lot better than factory hard chrome. A set of new OEM Honda fenders will run you somewhere in the range of $175 to $200. Also, I saw on NEVH website that the front fender went NLA about a year ago but they have plenty of stock at the moment.
     
  4. nemesis88

    nemesis88 Member

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    Wow! $100 for a bracket and rings! It's got a lot more expensive than I can remember. I did some motorcycle parts years back. Fenders will probably be 200 a piece! Guess I'll be buying new lol. Thanks Alan!
     
  5. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    I handed the plater 275 for the last pair of fenders I had triple-chromed. The fenders were prepped first...the undersides blasted back to "white metal", no dents left. I also took the surface prep about 75% of the way needed for the first strike of copper. That's not to save bucks, in most instances a shop will cringe at this. I have a lot of experience with this stuff and the plater knows this. What I want to see is the actual condition of the metal; the rust & pitting can be...and usually is...a lot more extensive than it appears to be at first glance. The parts still had to be chrome stripped, then final prepped and it's the skilled craftsmanship that comprises the lion's share of the cost. Once you understand what-all is actually involved, it's a lot easier making decisions regarding chromed parts. Chrome has been getting regulated to death, with the big hit occurring in 2006. Custom chrome shops are a vanishing breed.

    With a `77, there are fewer chromed pieces...one of those counterbalances I mentioned recently. The original parts that were chrome plated are largely either unique to the model, or scarce enough that there's not much choice. With the fenders, fork cap bolts, steering stem nut you have the option of going with new, OEM. I'd probably go for new but retain the original fenders & cap bolts. Now, consider "the rest"... Those late-`70s handlebars are rare, the odds of finding another pair that are straight...you don't want to know. The top tree, diecast fork rings (which require expen$ive cyanide copper) and engine guard, together probably won't quite reach the 300-dollar mark, would represent a minuscule cost savings compared to new replacements...if they could be found.

    I'd retain the original heat shielding, for the exhaust, and "mothball" the set. However, I'd go for new fronts and a reproduction rear (main) shield.

    Perhaps now you better understand why that set of turn signal parts was worth the asking price.

    The speedo is another one of those scarce parts. The good news is that this pretty well rounds-out the list of unobtainium & parts that command premium bucks. In the context of this entire project, the bottom line will likely be similar to the more popular K0-K1 bikes, perhaps less if you're doing a lot of the work yourself. This is why, imho, it pays to have a clear, overarching, goal...and take the broad view. Sure, some items are pricier than seems reasonable. That is, until you understand why they cost what they do...and...figure out the percentage impact they will have on the completed project. Generally speaking, with the earlier bikes chromed pieces represent up to 25% of the total restoration cost, depending upon the model, what parts have to be replaced and the condition. The counterbalance is the amazing ease with which most parts can be replaced, i.e. incredibly strong aftermarket & OEM support. With the later models, K4-on, there are more unobtainium parts but progressively less chrome with each passing year. IMO there's no point in obsessing over a few pricey items, everything tends to balance-out at the end.
     
  6. nemesis88

    nemesis88 Member

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    Thanks so much for that excellent reply. Very informative and most helpful. If anything I'll do the handlebars and buy the fenders. As you said by 77 alot of the chrome was gone so I'm ahead of the game. Thank you so much for that lesson!
     
  7. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Oh yeah...whatever that "spray-on black chrome", a.k.a. black paint ;) may lack in visual appeal it now returns in practicality, i.e. it's cheap and very easily redone, when/if/as needed.
     
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