Reclaimed S90

Discussion in 'The Gastank' started by red69, May 27, 2016.

  1. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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  2. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    Since my wife made the suggestion that black bags may look better on the bike, I took her command and ordered a set, in black. Another under $30 item shipped from China. Who am I to disobey a spouse?



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  3. scooter

    scooter Well-Known Member

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    Like the black - sharp
     
  4. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    I've been doing some small pieces on the white S90 I bought last year. I was able to get two pretty good chrome side panels and tank emblems that were being sold on Ebay. They make the tank look pretty good. I also tackled the fenders that were not treated very nice over 14,000 road miles. Had to resort to some body filler and copious sanding of filler and primer. Today I was able to finish up the satin clear-coat application.
     

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  5. allenp42

    allenp42 Active Member

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    That tank looks amazing. Same goes for the fenders.
     
  6. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    The tank caused a bit of grief. I needed a different mount at the rear. Later model S90's are bolted to the frame. My frame (1965) needed a slip-in mount that is encased in a piece of rubber. The original tank was well beyond rusty so I sourced a decent one that was a later model (bolt on). I had to swap out the old tank's mount and this involved welding. I tried two shops and neither wanted to touch a gas tank, so I did it myself. Of course it leaked, and following a racerx tip, I silver soldered everything. Voila, no leaks. You can see the mount located at the rear of the tank on the left side of this picture.

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  7. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    In hindsight, it would have been much easier to weld a nut to the frame to accept the bolt-on tank.
     
  8. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    Scooter rebuilt two sets of S90 rear shocks for me. The plastic "cans" were good on one set and the other set's cans can be described as non-existent and iffy. The iffy one I was able to wrap with fiberglass and epoxy to keep the plastic together. The other one I threw out because it was cracked and falling apart. I made a copy out of fiberglass and epoxy and it is good enough to use. The copy is on the left in the picture.
     

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  9. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    I reassembled one set of shocks with newly painted cans. Here is a before and after.
     

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  10. allenp42

    allenp42 Active Member

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    Nice work! Your repaired one looks great as well. I enjoyed seeing parts brought back from the grave.
     
  11. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    Here's another piece that needed attention. The main stand pivot pipe was rusted to the main stand and would not slide out even with persuasion from a hammer. I soaked it as best I could with a 1/2 acetone and 1/2 tranny fluid mix for a day. I hit it with the hammer and it still would not move. Next up, the heat wrench. Propane torched it into submission and the hammer persuader and it finally moved. After I got it out I cleaned it and the main stand bore. Now it slides in and out just fine.
     

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  12. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    As we have seen at one time or another, a misplaced battery vent tube can cause problems. The one on this S90 probably spent time inside the frame, causing holes to form in the steel. I used some 18 ga. sheet to repair the damage and it led to a second patch because of blow-through with the wire feed welder on the lowest setting. If I were better at welding it probably wouldn't have occurred. Oh well, it's repaired and ready for the blaster.
     

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  13. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    I had the frame blasted, did some body work, epoxy primed it and laid down some putty over the primer. Next is some wet sanding and final primer.

    The main stand was blasted and the step bar was straightened and paint removed. Both have been refinished.
     

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  14. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    I ordered a set of Thailand wheels for the current S90 I'm working on. The shipping surprised me as it only took a week and a half from the time the order was placed. Chrome plated with bearings installed.



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  15. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    I have a question concerning a hub distance collar. My thought is that it should fit between the wheel bearings, with no slop. On the new front wheel that I recently received, the distance collar moves laterally, with it being about 4mm short in length. Can anyone tell me if this is unacceptable? My guess is that it needs to be flush against the wheel bearings.
     
  16. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    In a word...YIKES!!!

    Good catch on this one, major safety item. I'd "dry fit" the offending wheel(s), axle torqued, to also verify overall width. (They could be repops and have some of that dreaded "design drift" that oftentimes creeps into the production chain.) Then replicate that sideload off the bike to see if the bearings were not seated, as-received. An overly long distance collar is nearly as bad...and just as dangerous over the long haul...as one that's too short. The distance collar not only prevents bearing failure from insane sideloading, it's a structural part of the axle and fork assemblies.

    Worst case, you'd need to machine a new distance collar. Happily, as machining projects go, it's pretty basic, i.e. cheap. You may be able to have an existing distance collar (from another hub) cut to length on a lathe.
     
  17. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    So, I finally got into the front hub of the new wheel and took a crude measurement. When compared to the new OEM distance collar I ordered, the new wheel's collar comes up short by 2.15 mm.

    Bob, what is the best way to remove one of those bearings from the new wheel? I assume it will be toast when all is said and done, right?
     
  18. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    It's going to depend upon how tight the interference fit is between bearing & hub. Two things kill bearings: lateral shock loading (hammering them out), damaging the seal (easy to do without specialty tools). That said, those hubs are polished, not painted. With no paint to ruin, you can use propane torch heat and a little careful aiming + timing, on the hub nose without leaving a trace. I'd limit the heat to ~300F. Apply the flame to the outside of the bearing seat shoulder, brake drum side. Shouldn't take more than 90-180 seconds to get the maximum thermal expansion. The axle would make a good heat sink, especially if you chill it in the freezer first...then slowly withdraw it, as the hub is heated, to keep the coldest portion in contact with the bearing inner race. With a little luck, you'll be able to pull the bearing with the axle, or it'll be loose enough to fall out. If not, the distance collar can be used to drive the bearing out. It won't contact the seal. If you can push the bearing out or tap it out, using your hand as the "hammer", it should survive the ordeal.

    FYI, I replace CT70 hub bearings as S.O.P. They're 25-49 years old, unsealed units...just better all the way around to start with new, sealed, bearings. IOW, not worth the effort to reuse the originals. But, in most cases it could be done.
     
  19. red69

    red69 Well-Known Member

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    Here are two responses I received from the vendor about my concerns over the distance collars from the "engineer".

    New message from: asian_motorparts1940s (4,049 iconRedStar_25x25.gif )
    "please don't worry about that
    when you use the Axle install that is fine
    please trust me
    I have S90 in my club more than 100 motorbikes
    they use my wheel
    please don't worry about Distance in the bearing collar
    this is not problem trust me
    I am engineer
    thanks a lot "

    New message from: asian_motorparts1940s (4,049 iconRedStar_25x25.gif )
    "please trust me about collar between the bearing
    distance 2.15 mm. that is not problem
    if over 4mm that problem
    your bearing will easy to broken but please don't worry
    they can use more than 2 years
    about 2.15mm. is not matter my friend
    thanks a lot"


    I think I've heard those words ("trust me") in the past. Not something you should hang your hat on.
     
  20. kirrbby

    kirrbby Well-Known Member

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    Lol...was it this guy?

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