So Many Low-Mileage Groms on CL?

Discussion in 'General' started by TexasJJB, Dec 26, 2017.

  1. TexasJJB

    TexasJJB Member

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    I'm in the market for a used Grom so that I can ride in faster traffic than my CT70 allows. I've noticed that there are a LOT of late-model (2017 & 2018) Groms on CL with very low miles ... in the 100 - 300 mile range. Seems strange that so many people would buy these bikes new and then sell them after a few months. Do you think that folks buy them and then just don't like them, or could some be stolen? They seem to advertise that they have clean titles, but I can't understand why they're so commonly sold before the break-in period is even up.
     
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  3. loopiemclooperson

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    They are entry level motorcycles, and motorcycles aren't for everyone. Alot of people like the idea of a bike more then the reality. I see the same thing in my neck of the woods. As for being stolen, I would familiarize my self with your states titles and verify vin numbers before handing over any dough. Bank liens can be a concern though. Also make sure the title is clear.
     
    #2 loopiemclooperson, Dec 26, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2017
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  4. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    One would be taking a big gamble by not running a VIN check on a late-model vehicle, it's never been easier to do.

    As for the number of bikes you're seeing, my overall summary would be: failure to live up to expectations...a.k.a. disappointment. IMHO, there's still way too much hype & BS surrounding these machines, starting with the dealerships, that try to overprice them. That is not to say it's a poor machine, it isn't. It is, however, a product of its time and clearly a scaled-down/toned-down crotch rocket. In bone-stock form, it's a competent suburban runabout. It's also mainly a young person's bike, because of the ergonomics, it's not a comfortable cruiser for many riders.

    A bike purchased/owned/ridden by an older person is the safest bet. You know why...:whistle:
     
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  5. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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    Speaking from the perspective of a father of a 14 year old son with an obsession for Groms, I'll throw in my two cents. They are awesome fun, not intimidating to new riders, and just enough power to get you around the suburbs. From the day they came out, I've always said they were modern day reincarnations of the CT line from back in our day.

    In my area, they have become almost exclusively the favorite of kids from 16-21. Their primary purpose has become wheelie riding, pack meet-ups, and YouTube vlogging. Just where I live (Omaha), we have 2 or 3 international YouTube "Grom stars" who have roughly 500,000 followers each.

    For the last few years, Groms have been the fidget spinner of motorcycles. Every suburban YouTube/Instagram addicted kid in that age range HAD to have one. Dealers couldn't get them fast enough, production ran behind, and they were sold at list price before the dealer received them.

    Just like fidget spinners, the craze just sort of crashed this past year. Supply finally caught up and exceeded demand just as the craze was slowing down. I bought a dirt bike for my son for Xmas and both dealers in my area had rows of Groms in November. Those bikes are still in their stock now. This time last year they were sold out. I think lots of rich parents bought them because their spoiled kids begged for them, wanting to emulate their YouTube heroes. When they figured out that being a professional vlogger was hard work, or that you could only ride 6 months out of the year in many parts of the country, they headed to Craigslist.

    I wouldn't be too concerned about the bikes being stolen unless it's in a bad neighborhood. I bet most are coming from rich suburbs. Just do your due diligence on VIN checks or other carfax type services.

    One other thought... In some cases they are stepping stones to supermotos or crotch rockets. Check YouTube for "Gromie Bear" and "Fooligan", both massively popular guys who live within minutes of me. They pump out content almost every day, even in our brutal Nebraska winter. Both make a full time living with AD clicks and merchandise branding.
     
    #4 ArcticMinibike, Jan 9, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
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  6. Deoodles

    Deoodles Active Member

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    I’ll add my 2 cents. After owning one for about 2 years then selling it on Craigslist. ArticMinibike probably has it correct. They are the CT70’s for today’s kids. Not overwhelming and more than capable of suburban duty. The issue for most of us here is that they are not our beloved classic CT70. I ended up selling mine not because of lack of excellent performance but specifically because it wasn’t a 70. A 108 stroker can match it in power and speed. Granted with new technology the Grom does it better but it still isn’t CT70. As for why so many? My guess is similar to the previous post. How many owners are first timers and didn’t get bit by the bug.
     
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  7. motoman287

    motoman287 Member

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    Most of you seem spot on. I own several CT's, never had any growing up, and was too young to have grown up with them in dealerships (I'm 31). For whatever reason, they're the bike I wish I could have had, or maybe they're from an era I wish I was a part of...either way, I enjoy them. I have a few stockers, and also built up a '93 for the street, with a 117cc motor. I then bought a '94 from a member here with a Nice 110 in it, thinking the wife and I could enjoy them. Long story short, she wasn't fond of the kick starting, and higher speeds on the 10" wheels didn't exactly build confidence in her. I ended up taking the Nice bike back to stock and selling it, and bought a Grom.

    The guy I bought the Grom from said he was at a dealership for an ATV, and saw the Grom. The dealer told him he had to try it, which he did. He ended up telling them to throw it in the back of his truck, completely an impulse buy. In the end, he'd put a fender eliminator kit on it, and put 14 miles on it. Sold it to me for several hundred under dealer price.

    Comparing a Grom to a CT is hard for me, because they're just different enough, if that makes sense. I can appreciate the fuel injection, the electric start, the digital gauges, super bright headlight, the roomier cockpit (I'm 6' 2") of the Grom, but it's still mainly a stock bike aside from exhaust. My 117 CT is unique, alot of custom or aftermarket parts, and it draws way more attention than the Grom. The CT is less comfortable (probably something I could work on, with bar position), and is generally less technologically advanced, which is to be expected 20+ years later.

    All ranting aside, my wife prefers the Grom, I have a place in my heart for both. A buddy and I have taken them around some neighboring larger towns, and the CT, while down a few cc's, completely stomps the Grom in a race, from bottom to top. I do see a lot more Groms for sale these days. Many of them are low mileage '17 models. I suspect some of your theories are playing out, or people are buying them as an introduction to motorcycling and deciding it's not for them, hence a bunch of low mileage used bikes.
     
  8. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    IMHO, we're conflating two issues; the question that was asked and comparing the MSX125 (a.k.a. Grom) with the CT70. Both are valid, key, topics but they are different. I think we've covered the reasons behind the oversupply on CL. Comparing the two models is much bigger topic.

    Without question, the Grom is the more technically-developed machine. It's 2005-era engineering vs 1965. Considering the technology gap, the CT & Z50 hold up amazingly well. I mean, compare them to late 1920s-1930s era bikes...the evolutionary differences are vastly greater. That said, stock vs stock (Grom, CT70) bikes, the Grom wins hands-down. Where things get interesting is in the subjective area, i.e. personal preferences and untapped potential. For anyone who might be interested, it is possible to surpass the capabilities of the Grom in virtually every category...it's just a lot more involved than writing a check.

    In practical, but highly-biased, terms I prefer the classic/iconic machine albeit in highly-modified form. I'm a pragmatist. So, despite preferring the lines of the CT, I could live with the aesthetics of MSX125. I had planned to add one to the fleet. However, with the differences in suspension, braking and power leveled-out, it was an easy choice. The CT is far more comfortable, for me, and versatile. Others, especially those who are ~45 years younger, will have different perspectives.
     
  9. ArcticMinibike

    ArcticMinibike Active Member

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    Off the original subject here (sorry)but "comfort" has been mentioned a couple of times or more in this thread. My son and I noticed a couple of days ago that the 2018 Groms were not quite as comfortable as the earlier years. I couldn't put my finger on why. Maybe the seat shape or material changed, maybe I was imagining it, but we both noticed it independently without discussion at the time.

    Further off topic... With wrap technology so prevalent, wouldn't it be cool to take a stock Grom and have a retro CT70 style wrap made for it? K0 red, black vertical wide bar with silver pin stripes, "HONDA" or maybe "GROM" in classic Honda font crossing the black bar. That would be a fun project. A modern bike paying homage to its roots. You'd be the only kid on your block with a Grom like that!
     
  10. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    In terms of comfort, I mean inherent differences in ergonomics. IMO, the Grom is a short-distance sport/stunt bike. There's a reason why you won't see a touring bike with this kind of rider position & seating, it's fatiguing. With the CT, normal rider position is more cruiser...and flexible, the rider isn't locked-into the bike. It's also a lot easier to alter handlebar & seat configurations, if desired. That doesn't matter to everyone. Different riders, different priorities.

    As for "personalizing" a Grom, that seems to be the norm. But, it's mostly point & click creativity, imho. That's fine for younger riders, who are just getting their initiation into the world of bikes. I won't speak for everyone but, for this old-school dinosaur, that holds little interest. FWIW, I like your idea of doing something unique, with some actual creativity & craftsmanship.
     

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