Some clone improvments

Deoodles

Well-Known Member
I know some here may not care much for my mods but isn't it what makes me happy. I have made some improvements to make my clone safer and more pleasing to me. I replaced the rear swing arm bolt and rear hub with Honda. Replaced the fenders with repops and mounted the front up high. Cut the tail off the rear light and replaced the 350-10 tires with 400-10 Bridgestone Molas 16 tires. It had a stator plate oil leak and I was able to find Honda seals that fit. One was from a passport starter and the other from a CT0. Stator outer oring from a CT70. Last was stickers. I chose 1978 CT70 because I like the way they look on it. Insured and titled now as well. It will never be a Honda but is as much fun riding it. The peace of mind knowing If something happens to it its no big deal. Still enjoy my HKO and working on my 74 stroker, but enjoy the Skyteam clone as well.
 

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Deoodles

Well-Known Member
Your Skyteam looks very much like my DAX. Fenders, grab bar, etc. May have been patterned after the DAXs of those years. 1988 DAX

I believe you are correct Kirrbby. There are a lot of similarities. maybe one day I will put a Honda motor in it :15:
 
Looks great I have an 04 jenching trail 70 that I’m doing the same thing to it only has 35 original miles on it. I bought it for riding around my summer house in southern ri. If I figure out how to take a picture I’ll show it. Anthony.
 

69ST

Well-Known Member
Most, if not all, Dax knockoffs were based on the AB26 Dax, which was the last model Honda produced.

The biggest upside of a Chinese clone bike is that, since it has very little market resale value, it's a nice "blank canvas" for you to customize into something better. Just about anything you change is going to result in an improved bike. I've seen some high-end bikes built out of clones. Those were mostly across-the-pond, where OEM frames are scarce. In North America, CT70 frames are not rare and that pre-17-digit-era VIN can make life a LOT easier.
 
Most, if not all, Dax knockoffs were based on the AB26 Dax, which was the last model Honda produced.

The biggest upside of a Chinese clone bike is that, since it has very little market resale value, it's a nice "blank canvas" for you to customize into something better. Just about anything you change is going to result in an improved bike. I've seen some high-end bikes built out of clones. Those were mostly across-the-pond, where OEM frames are scarce. In North America, CT70 frames are not rare and that pre-17-digit-era VIN can make life a LOT easier.
Thx great information I’ll try to post a few pictures when it’s complete if I can figure out how to do it. lol
 

OLD CT

Well-Known Member
Hit Post Reply. Type a few words first then hit Upload a File button, that should take you to the stored pictures in your computer. Double click on the picture. BOOM! Pictures!
 
I know some here may not care much for my mods but isn't it what makes me happy. I have made some improvements to make my clone safer and more pleasing to me. I replaced the rear swing arm bolt and rear hub with Honda. Replaced the fenders with repops and mounted the front up high. Cut the tail off the rear light and replaced the 350-10 tires with 400-10 Bridgestone Molas 16 tires. It had a stator plate oil leak and I was able to find Honda seals that fit. One was from a passport starter and the other from a CT0. Stator outer oring from a CT70. Last was stickers. I chose 1978 CT70 because I like the way they look on it. Insured and titled now as well. It will never be a Honda but is as much fun riding it. The peace of mind knowing If something happens to it its no big deal. Still enjoy my HKO and working on my 74 stroker, but enjoy the Skyteam clone as well.
Hi I’m doing the same thing with the front fender was the modification hard also I’m going to put a chrome engine guard on old ct told me I would have to and nuts with a bung my friend from work is a welder and said he would help me when I’m done I’ll post some pictures.
 

69ST

Well-Known Member
Adding upper engine guard mounts to the frame isn't difficult. Getting them accurately located can be. Welding them in, without destroying paint is impossible. There are such things as Nutserts and they work pretty well, no welding required. Welded bungs are superior as there is no chance of them ever vibrating loose.
 

Deoodles

Well-Known Member
Hi I’m doing the same thing with the front fender was the modification hard also I’m going to put a chrome engine guard on old ct told me I would have to and nuts with a bung my friend from work is a welder and said he would help me when I’m done I’ll post some pictures.

Not hard but the nut on the upper right side of the frame can’t be welded There isn’t access to weld that one. Racer mentions nutserts that may solve that issue. Pre fit to mark the holes then drill. If I remember correctly the clone has thicker metal up front. You could try a tap on that one bolt hole. Show us when your done
 

69ST

Well-Known Member
Not hard but the nut on the upper right side of the frame can’t be welded There isn’t access to weld that one. Racer mentions nutserts that may solve that issue. Pre fit to mark the holes then drill. If I remember correctly the clone has thicker metal up front. You could try a tap on that one bolt hole. Show us when your done

There are so many possible methods that we could make this a very long thread, just discussing them. There's not much real estate to work with in this area of the frame. Welding hex nuts isn't a lot of fun, the zinc plating must be removed, to get a clean weld, and un-plated M6 hex nuts aren't very common.

My preferred method is to fab a plate, from a scrap of 0.250" steel. That's thick enough to drill & tap. Then it's largely just a matter of locating the frame holes, using this as your template. If you can't access it from inside the frame, using a MIG, it can be plug-welded from the outside of the frame.
 
There are so many possible methods that we could make this a very long thread, just discussing them. There's not much real estate to work with in this area of the frame. Welding hex nuts isn't a lot of fun, the zinc plating must be removed, to get a clean weld, and un-plated M6 hex nuts aren't very common.

My preferred method is to fab a plate, from a scrap of 0.250" steel. That's thick enough to drill & tap. Then it's largely just a matter of locating the frame holes, using this as your template. If you can't access it from inside the frame, using a MIG, it can be plug-welded from the outside of the frame.
That’s great I’ll have one of our welders fabracate the piece I need then tap it. Thx
 
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