WTB: Chrome Grab Handle

Discussion in 'Wanted/Looking For' started by Kansas Corey, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. Kansas Corey

    Kansas Corey Member

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    I know these are available through several vendors and eBay, but thought I'd see if anyone here had a spare one for sale?

    Chrome is great, but would also take one that needs a little love as well. Hoping to not spend $25 (vendor price) on something that falls into my "nice to have" bucket as opposed to the items that are "need to have" like replacement rear shocks.

    Thanks - Corey


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  3. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    Do yourself a favor...just say "NO".o_O

    FYI, don't be fooled by the threaded bosses in the frame. ST model Daxes, sold outside the North American market, never came with the CT70 engine guard and those frames had the 4 threaded bosses, behind the steering tube. this is not a CT70 part, never was. As a lift handle, it's useless; the ergonomics couldn't be much worse. This was an ST70 Dax part, for models fitted with a center stand and was used to help rock the bike backward, onto the stand. Most people are right-handed and, the bike is so light that the handlebars work much better...even for the intended purpose of that handle. At best, it's a decorative item. Far more likely, the only functional change you'll realize is a little paint damage, at the mounting points.
     
  4. Kansas Corey

    Kansas Corey Member

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    racerx - I was going to bolt it to the 2 threaded bosses on the right side of the bike directly under the seat (similar the 1st image I attached above) for the grab handle. Figured it would help me pick up the back end to move around in the garage instead of using the back of the seat.

    As far as the other threaded bosses on my 1979 CT70, 3 of the 4 front ones have black plugs (4th is clip for wires on right side near front fork). I also have 2 more with black plugs on the left side of the bike close to the bottom edge of the seat as well.

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  5. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    `79 was an odd duck. It still had all of the CT & ST70 frame bosses...those went away when the CT70 model nomenclature was superseded by the JH prefix (though the bike was still called CT70).

    Trust me on this one, I started out with that "lift handle", circa 2000. The remains of a JDM Dax that became my daily rider was fitted with the center stand + the OEM handle. I replaced the center stand with a side stand and sourced an NOS handle from across the pond. That handle location is beyond useless. All you'll get for your efforts is damage to that nice-looking factory paint.

    The only lift handle I've seen that has any use is, essentially, a rear luggage rack minus all but the single crossbar/loop closest to the seat. Those are all later-vintage aftermarket. The closest thing(s) to viable lift points are the rear fender, preferably where it is supported by the frame...in a pinch no more than a palm width beyond the rearmost mount...or the muffler, used in conjunction with the fender. That's how I lift the rear of mine, to extract from or load the bike into an another vehicle. If you don't already know, the seat pan absolutely should not be used as a lifting point; you'll bend, then break the pan...and...eventually...the frame metal around the seat latch mounting bolts.
     
  6. Kansas Corey

    Kansas Corey Member

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    racerx - always really appreciate the responses and the insight!

    Looks like I'll forgo the grab handle then... As far as lift points, when loading the bike, I've actually just been grabbing the rear shocks (one in both hands) and picking it up in kind of a whole body motion while someone else steadies the front end. Just glad the bike isn't any heavier.

    With regards to lifting with the seat, my seat pan already has a few tweaks that can be seen if you look very closely on the bottom side. It was that way when I bought it, but still bothers me. I've adjusted the seat as much as I can and believe that any tweaks that exist do not have any impact on the safety or functionality of the bike.

    Thanks again - now I'm off to other projects on the bike. Next up are painting the wheels and rebuilding front shocks (forks).
     
  7. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    The rear shocks are, structurally speaking, the best lifting points...if you don't count the rear wheel and that's kinda awkward. I use the the muffler and rear fender for that final "alley oop", loading the bike into a vehicle or on/off the workbench. That's when I miss the luggage rack, it was a really usable lift handle. FWIW, I agree with you on the weight, especially since it just keeps getting heavier every year.;)

    Seat pan tweaks are almost unavoidable, to some extent. Straightening a pan is possible but usually involved and requires R&Ring the cover & foam. You're right, there's probably nothing to worry about, at all. Honda redesigned the pan at least a couple of times during the 1970s. You've got the "latest & greatest" of the 6v era seat pans. It's reinforced where it counts. I've not run across one, of this design, that's been cracked. That's in large part because there aren't many of them out there. However, the last of service replacements Honda produced, circa 2008, had essentially the same construction as yours and a really heavy vinyl cover. The K0-K1 crowd...the vast majority...have the toughest challenge keeping a seat intact...weak pan design, perishable latex foam padding and thinner vinyl. Those require a LOT of work to repair, reinforce (so the breakage won't return) and properly finish.

    IMO, refinishing the cloud silver pieces should make this bike look sensational.

    While the seals are out of the fork legs, plan on giving the inside of the lowers a thorough cleaning. Come refill time, I'd start with 15W fork oil; you can always drain it and refill with 20W fork oil if suspension action is still too squishy. Compress the fork legs fully (easy when there are no springs to fight) then add oil until it's visibly within ~3" of the top. Then, with the cap replaced but loose enough to allow airflow pump the fork leg a few times to drive out trapped air and recheck the oil level. It'll probably be low enough that you can't see it. Refill to ~4" below the top, leg fully compressed. Then fully extend the leg, replace the cap tightly enough to seal and test the action by compressing it. If you get hydrolock before it can bottom out, pour out ~5cc of oil and retest...repeat if necessary. Once it no longer hydrolocks that's it, the action has been tuned as much as possible with oil quantity. OTOH, if you can bottom it out easily, add ~5cc and repeat the process until you just feel the onset of hydrolock. Getting the oil quantity to the ragged edge is absolutely worth the effort. The amount of improvement is surprising, and IMHO, this style fork performs better than seems possible, when setup this way.
     
  8. Kansas Corey

    Kansas Corey Member

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    Awesome - thank you for the front fork oil information - I had been researching it lately and this saves me a TON of time! I'll follow the directions to the "T". Thanks again!
     
  9. Kansas Corey

    Kansas Corey Member

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    racerx - I know we're in an oddball side of the forum, but wanted to give a quick update. I initially did this exactly as described about 2-3 weeks ago with very good results. Your instructions were fantastic - simple and straightforward which is just my style.

    Then about 3 days ago, while doing some other work (different thread), disaster stuck... Nothing terrible, but that pissed off annoyance that causes a few quick swear words to randomly fly as your brain wraps around what just occurred? Well in my case, I was looking at changing the engine oil and getting things laid out. The weird thing was that my 1 quart of engine oil wasn't full?? As my head swirled for a few seconds and the fog lifted, I quick sprinted to the other side of the garage about 5-6 feet away and grabbed my bottle of fork oil.

    Not much to my surprise, the quart of fork oil was completely full and sealed... I rebuilt my forks the first time with 10W40 4-stroke engine oil which might explain why they seemed squishy after just a small amount of use.

    Here is the good news: on my second pass at tearing the front end down last night, I was able to go start to finish (everything completely reassembled) in about 3 hours including a break for dinner and time playing with my youngest boy. Total work time was probably 1.5 hours. Forks now have the proper oil in them, I was able to double check the torque on my steering stem, and re-route a few wires & cables to look a little cleaner. Plus, I love working on these things!

    As always - thanks for the support and knowledge share - Corey
     
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  10. racerx

    racerx Administrator
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    That's par for the course...for any of us, at some point or other. Show me a bike owner/mechanic who's never reached the gratuitous obscene oath stage (a.k.a. time to put it away and come back tomorrow, after the adrenaline level has returned to normal) and I'll show you someone who lacks passion...and likely hasn't learned much along the way. Ask me how I know this.:whistle:

    I seriously doubt that motor oil will hurt anything inside the fork legs. It has greater lubricity than ATF, which was the original fork oil, ~7W as I recall. What fork oil has is resistance to foaming, plus the option of using heavier 10W, 15W or 20W viscosity to tune the shock action. Done right, which just takes a little patience, these K1-`79 forks perform remarkably well. If only Honda had given them another 1-1.5" of travel...
     

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